Domination achieved

My post before this one was on the Global Gender Gap Index (GGGI), which is used by many news media, institutes, and even governments, as a foundation to argue that “women are disadvantaged compared to men in all countries in the world, and need to be awarded advantages to compensate for that.” I criticized the GGGI on three points, showing that it clearly purports a feminist agenda rather than trying to fight for parity between the sexes. Two weeks after I wrote that post, an article appeared in the high-quality scientific journal PLOS One, on this very topic. The article by Gijsbert Stoet and David C. Geary, titled “A simplified approach to measuring national gender inequality,” not only makes the same arguments as I did, but also demonstrates, using literature references, that in many areas men fall behind women. The article proposes a more objective measurement of gender parity than the activist one used by the GGGI, which is called the Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI).

The BIGI is based on three components, namely (1) educational opportunities in childhood; (2) healthy life expectancy; and (3) overall life satisfaction. These three components share the fact that they are independent from life choices. For example, education is only examined in childhood, while tertiary education is excluded; the reason is that education in childhood is not a choice, while the decision to get into tertiary (university) education may be. So the fact that far more women than men go to university in developed countries is not giving women an advantage, as you cannot know whether this is because men are disadvantaged or that men on average simply do not like to go to university.

Education and life span are also components of the GGGI, but two notes should be made for the GGGI: (1) education is capped at 1.00, meaning that the fact that women are highly advantaged over men in developed countries in this respect is counted as ‘equality’; and (2) life expectancy is counted as equal when women live 6% longer than men, i.e., in a country where women only live 3% longer than men, the GGGI calls them ‘disadvantaged.’ The most remarkable thing, however, is that the third component, life satisfaction, is not even taken into account for the GGGI, while Stoet and Geary rightfully argue that “while it is very difficult to determine the degree to which men and women are disadvantaged in any particular aspect of life, an overall assessment of life satisfaction likely reflects the combination of advantages and disadvantages they have experienced, whatever they might be.”

Stoet and Geary use the BIGI to rate gender inequality in 134 countries. They also calculate the AADP, which basically is the variance in calculating the BIGI, to account for the fact that a country may have a BIGI close to zero (reflecting parity) while there are still high disadvantages for each of the genders, but in different areas. The “best” situation for a country is having both the BIGI and the AADP close to zero, meaning that men and women are treated in exactly the same way.

Stoet and Geary reach the unsurprising (to me, at least) conclusion that in underdeveloped countries women are usually disadvantaged over men, which is mainly the result of restricted education, while in developed countries women tend to be advantaged over men, which is mainly the result of a higher healthy life expectancy. It should be noted, however, that even though men tend to be disadvantaged compared to women in more developed countries, the higher the level of development in a country is, the closer it tends to be to complete gender equality.

Naturally, you can have a critical discussion about the components in the BIGI. However, the BIGI is a scale without an agenda: it tries to measure gender inequality in an objective way, rather than explicitly sell a biased message, as the GGGI does. One can only hope that research such as this makes governments in developed countries realize that the notion that women as a group are disadvantaged is not grounded in reality, and that letting radical feminists set their agenda is not a good idea.

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